Fishermen head back to Bass Harbor after a day hauling traps.

Working Waterfront

Fishing—a risky business

Fishermen face two realities on the water. There's the potential for accidents that could result in death, injury or vessel loss. Then there's the sheer pain many live with every day, a result of the bodily stresses they endure doing this hard work. Hazardous working conditions, strenuous labor, long work… SEE MORE
Students from the Blueberry Harvest School learn about sustainable fisheries during an August 2014 trip in Frenchman Bay.

Working Waterfront

Hispanics help Washington County grow

Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of stories about how immigration is changing the face of the Maine coast. The writer, Jennifer Atkinson, is a lawyer in Friendship who specializes in immigration matters. If asked to name the most ethnically diverse towns in Maine few people would… SEE MORE
Firefighters squeeze into the galley to fight a simulated grease fire.

Working Waterfront

Fire in the galley!

Charles Salerno surveys the scene with a sharp eye. Several figures in bright yellow and orange jackets and pants crawl up to a doorway, their breathing masks and oxygen tanks making movement difficult. Their helmets bounce off of one another's visors, and their heavy gloves make handling the 2-inch hose… SEE MORE
Robin Alden

Working Waterfront

Robin Alden recognized as innovator in fisheries work

STONINGTON — Robin Alden is the recipient of the 2015 Innovator Award as part of the first SOURCE Maine Sustainability Awards presented on April 9 at Pineland Farms in New Gloucester. The award is one of seven given to Maine leaders, organizations and businesses. "Alden has made it her life's work to… SEE MORE
A seawall is built at Popham Beach in Phippsburg in March 2013 to protect homes from the sea.

Working Waterfront

Offshore sand and gravel extraction boon, threat

When Superstorm Sandy rolled over the Jersey shore, it washed away some 20 million cubic yards of beach sand. Replacing that resource is not optional, many believe, because decimated beaches kill tourism economies and leave coastal areas more vulnerable to damage from the next storm. So where does the sand… SEE MORE

Working Waterfront

Keeping it live at Andy’s in the Old Port

PHOTO ESSAY BY KATIE JOHNSON SEE THE SLIDESHOW Looking for live music? Andy’s Old Port Pub is locally famous for having music every night of the week. Owners and Great Diamond Island residents Rick Frantz and Jennifer Fox’s support music draws performers from all over the state, country and occasionally… SEE MORE
Commercial Street in Portland.

Working Waterfront

Cumberland is Maine’s fastest growing county

The U.S. Census Bureau reported on where the heaviest population growth in Maine was concentrated last year. The fastest-growing county in Maine between July 1, 2013, and July 1, 2014, was Cumberland, whose population rose 0.67 percent over the period. Cumberland was followed by York (0.62 percent), Knox (0.22 percent),… SEE MORE
A portion of the image depicting the "genuine originals" group.

Working Waterfront

Tourism office targets three groups for marketing

AUGUSTA — It probably would be rude to ask the tourists you see this summer if they are "balanced achievers," "genuine originals" or "social sophisticates." But if the Maine Tourism Office is successful, the chances are likely that visitors will fall into one of those three groups. The strategy for… SEE MORE